Hoya Kerrii

This vining beauty boasts the most spectacular speckled foliage, sure to make your heart skip a beat.

The Story

I first saw this beauty as I was researching Hoya Obovata care. I couldn't believe such a plant existed, and began calling local nurseries to see if they had any in stock. They didn't and each one proceeded to tell me how rare of a plant it was! Well, on one fine day, I saw the Folia Collective post a picture of one they had in stock in their store. I asked if I could pay in advance and have a friend pick it up. She agreed, and then it was time to reveal to my friend how crazy of a plant lady I truly was. Thankfully this was a close friend, she was a bridesmaid actually, so she totally accepts my peculiarities and...she picked up the plant. A few months later, my husband and I took a 6 hr road trip down to SoCal to visit her and another close friend. We returned with this Hoya Kerrii. 

Care Routine:

  • Bright indirect light (it sees the sky, but is not within the sun's direct line of vision)
  • Allow it to dry out in between waterings, wait until older leaves are tender to the touch
  • I mix my potting soil with equal parts perlite aka sponge rock
  • Train on a trellis as vines stiffen over time.
  • I used to mist, never again. I found misting for this particular plant led to the development of fungal spots on its leaves. I would suggest increasing humidity by grouping your plants together or keeping moist peat around the plant. 
  • Occasionally, I have had a new baby leaf turn yellow or pink and then fall off. I believe this was due to lack of light.

 


“[...] It seemed as though the outpouring of her fresh young heart, claimed kindred with the loveliest things in nature.” Charles Dickens in Oliver Twist

Asparagus Retrofractus

A truly whimsical plant with its stems sprouting out delightful clusters of green goodness.

The Story

This was one of the first plants that I bought after my husband and I moved into our home. It used to just have a couple of short shoots going straight up. I typically like to buy more mature plants because I love how dramatic they can be, but I also have developed an appreciation for buying young starter plants such as this. It has been really fun to see how far its come, and the unique shape that it takes as it sprouts new growth. (:

Care Routine:

  • It has survived in partial shade, approx. 6 feet from our west window with slow growth, but I recently moved it to be only 1 foot away from the window. It thrived with more bright indirect light and put out ~3x the growth.
  • I water after the top 2 inches are dry, this plant seems to enjoy its soil being on the more moist side. Opposite of Hoyas.
  • I mix my potting soil with some peat moss, but this one hasn't been a picky plant, another reason why I love it!

“[...]They watched the sun as he sank lower and lower, and, at length, cast over sky and earth those brilliant hues which herald his departure.” Charles Dickens in Oliver Twist

Ceropegia Woodii Variegata

Also known as "String of Hearts," this succulent stands out from its peers with its delicate heart-shaped leaves and unique variegation.

The Story

Oh, how far this one has come. My husband and I made our first nursery visit on the way back from our Honeymoon at Halfmoon Bay Nursery (a favorite till this day). He told me I could go crazy, and well...I did. I bought this variegated string of hearts along with its non-variegated counterpart.  They were both in  4" pots with just a few strings, none of which were cascading. Within a few months, the non-variegated brethren had begun to trail past its pot. This one though, showed minimal growth, with vines shooting upward only dreaming of one day dangling next to its counterpart. Well one year later, she has reminded us that patience truly is a virtue.  

Care Routine:

  • Bright indirect light (it sees the sky, but is not within the sun's direct line of vision). Even though this one survived in a medium light spot, it didn't do much until I hung it 1 foot away from a west-facing window.
  • Water from the bottom. This avoids getting the top soil wet. Allow it to dry out in between waterings, wait until leaves start to curl ever so slightly.
  • I mix my potting soil with equal parts perlite aka sponge rock to create well draining soil.
  • This one rea

"The earth had donned her mantle of brightest green; and shed her richest perfumes abroad. It was the prime and vigour of the year; all things were glad and flourishing." Charles Dickens in Oliver Twist

Alocasia Odora Variegata

A plant with foliage that is extraordinary in every way, in size, in color, and shape.

The Story

How far have you traveled for a dream plant? My husband and I took a road trip down to San Diego for our 1 year anniversary this June. We were going to fly, but he suggested we drive so that we could bring more plants home...WHAT. He's totally not that into it, it was an act of love. Long story short, we found this beauty at Gardens by the Sea and we buckled her in to our back seat. She stayed with us in two hotels and my husband was the one to carry her from the car, to the room, back into the car, and so on and so forth. I sure hope she lives forever, but if she doesn't, these memories will...unless I get dementia. 

Care Routine:

  • Bright indirect light (it sees the sky, but is not within the sun's direct line of vision)
  • Water from the bottom. Wait until leaves begin to droop slightly. This plant has thick stems that can retain lots of water, so I have to be careful not to overwater as it can lead to a sad death. 
  • I mix my potting soil with peat moss and perlite to create well draining soil.

"The memories which peaceful country scenes call up, are not of this world, nor of its thoughts and hopes. " Charles Dickens in Oliver Twist

Hoya Obovata

With its deep green color and medallion-shaped leaves, One cannot help but adore the foliage of this plant

The Story

If I ever thought I did not have an obsessive personality, this plant proved otherwise. I first saw it when I was in SoCal for a wedding. My husband and I had just stopped into Folia Collective to take an innocent peek. Then, there was this beautiful plant just screaming out to me..."I know you want me,so don't keep saying your hands are tied" (cue The Greatest Showman). Alas the stars were not aligned, because I was not crazy enough (at the time) to bring the plant into the wedding with me, and it surely would have withered away in our car. I return to San Francisco, feeling like a part of my heart was left at Folia, but determined to find one. Many calls later, Half Moon Bay Nursery tells me they have one more in stock. Well you betcha I hoped in my care to bring my baby home! They seem to stock them fairly regularly so over the year, I have accumulated 5, 4 of which live in my Hoya Wall. (:

Care Routine:

  • Bright indirect light (it sees the sky, but is not within the sun's direct line of vision)
  • Allow it to dry out in between waterings, wait until older leaves are tender to the touch
  • I mix my potting soil with equal parts perlite aka sponge rock
  • This one seems to be able to go without a trellis for longer than a Kerrii, as the vines seem to stay flexible for longer. I am letting mine hang wild and free for now. =)
  • No Misting. Hoya Obovata did not develop fungal spots like the Hoya Kerrii, but I am playing it on the safe side and the plant seems to be fine without it. 
  • Bonus note: When I first bought this plant from the nursery, the leaves were a dullish light green, but after being in my home for a few months, the reduced amount of direct sunlight led to this gorgeous forest green. =)

"The boy stirred, and smiled in his sleep, as though these marks of pity and compassion had awakened some pleasant dream of a love and affection he had never known; as a strain of gentle music, or the rippling of water in a silent place, or the odour of a flower, or the mention of a familiar word, will sometimes call up sudden dim remembrances of scenes that never were, in this life; which vanish like a breath; and which some brief memory of a happier existence, long gone by, would seem to have awakened, for no voluntary exertion of the mind can ever recall them." Charles Dickens in Oliver Twist